Washington State Institute for Public Policy
Prev
Next
May 2017
WSIPP’s Board of Directors authorized WSIPP to work on a joint project with the MacArthur Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts, with additional support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, to extend WSIPP’s benefit-cost analysis to certain health care topics.

We present new benefit-cost findings for interventions in four health care areas: 1) interventions to promote healthy pregnancy and birth; 2) therapies to treat opioid use disorder; 3) collaborative primary care; and 4) patient-centered medical homes. These benefit-cost findings build on our meta-analytic results released in December 2016.

As part of this work, we conducted a primary analysis of Washington State birth certificate and hospital discharge data to estimate the costs related to key birth indicators. This analysis is a new addition to WSIPP’s benefit-cost model and is discussed comprehensively in the Health Care Technical Appendix.
Related:
May 2017
The 2016 Washington State Legislature created the Statewide Reentry Council with the goals of reducing recidivism and improving other outcomes for people who return to the community after incarceration. This legislation also directed WSIPP to examine the effectiveness of reentry programs through a systematic review of the research literature.

Using WSIPP’s standardized procedures, we examined 59 programs to estimate their average effectiveness in reducing recidivism and improving other outcomes. In this report, we describe our meta-analytic and benefit-cost findings for these programs.
Related:
December 2016
The 2015 Washington State Legislature directed WSIPP to review existing literature and begin a four-year study to evaluate outcomes regarding the cost-effectiveness of FDA-approved long-acting injectable medications, focusing on the benefits to persons in prison when they are released into the community.

We review the research evidence on the effectiveness of these medications in reducing substance abuse and recidivism rates. Where possible, we calculate whether the benefits of administering long-acting injectable medications outweigh the costs.
Download: Report
Related:
December 2016
The Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) Board of Directors authorized a collaborative project with the MacArthur Foundation and Pew Charitable Trusts to extend WSIPP’s benefit-cost analysis to higher education programs.

This report reviews the evidence on four types of interventions: 1) financial aid, 2) student advising, 3) interventions in the summer before college, and 4) dual enrollment.
Download: Report
Related:
December 2016
WSIPP’s Board of Directors authorized WSIPP to work on a joint project with the MacArthur Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts, with additional support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, to extend WSIPP’s benefit-cost analysis to certain health care topics.

We present meta-analytic findings for programs in four health care areas: 1) the promotion of healthy pregnancy and birth; 2) therapies to treat opioid use disorder; 3) the integration of behavioral health and primary care, and 4) patient-centered medical homes.
Download: Report
Related:
December 2016
The 2015 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy to conduct a benefit-cost analysis of the state's ferry vessel procurement practices. This report presents the results of a benefit-cost analysis (BCA) and economic impact analysis (EIA) of a change in policy that shifts construction of ferries out of state. Neither analysis predicts a significant impact on Washington’s economy (either positively or negatively) from building ferries out of state.
Download: Report
Related:
September 2016
The 2013 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) to create, in consultation with the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), University of Washington Evidence-Based Practice Institute (EBPI), University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute (ADAI), and the Washington Institute for Mental Health Research and Training (WIMHRT), an inventory of evidence-based, research-based, and promising practices.

The initial inventory of interventions and policies in adult mental health and chemical dependency services was published in May 2014. To view the May 2014 results, click here. An update to this inventory was published in January 2015.

While we were not directed by the legislature to update this inventory, a WSIPP Board-approved contract with the Division of Behavioral Health and Rehabilitation at the Department of Social and Health Services enabled WSIPP to review fourteen additional programs and update previously reviewed programs.
Download: Report Inventory
Related:
July 2016
The Washington State Institute for Public Policy's (WSIPP) Board of Directors approved a contract between WSIPP, the Department of Health, and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction to evaluate outcomes and conduct a benefit-cost analysis of the GRADS program.

GRADS is a K–12 program for pregnant and parenting teens that focuses on helping students take on the "dual role" of student and parent and prepare them for the world of work. In this evaluation, we compare teen mothers that participated in GRADS to a group of similar teen mothers from districts that did not offer the program.

Based on the results of our analysis, we estimate that GRADS participants have a 10.6 percentage point higher rate of high school graduation by age 22 and a 6.5 percentage point higher rate of postsecondary course enrollment by age 24.
Download: Report
Related:
December 2015
Education and Employment Training (EET) is a program, currently operating exclusively in King County, for juvenile offenders at moderate- to high-risk to re-offend.

In 2010, EET was designated a “promising program” by the Community Juvenile Accountability Act oversight committee. At that time, the Washington State Institute for Public Policy agreed to evaluate the program when enough time had passed to measure the program’s effect on recidivism. This study compares recidivism rates for youth served by EET to that of similar juvenile offenders served by other court programs in Pierce and Snohomish Counties.
Download: Report
Related:
December 2015
The Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) Board of Directors authorized WSIPP to work on a joint project with the MacArthur Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts to extend WSIPP’s benefit-cost analysis to certain health care topics.

We present findings for four new topics: 1) hospital–based programs to reduce Cesarean sections; 2) school-, workplace-, and community-based obesity prevention programs; 3) accountable care organizations; and 4) patient cost sharing. We also summarize prior findings for six topics: 1) “lifestyle” programs designed to prevent diabetes; 2) behavioral interventions to reduce obesity in adults and children; 3) transitional care to prevent hospital readmissions; 4) patient-centered medical homes to reduce health care costs; 5) programs to reduce avoidable emergency department visits; and 6) smoking cessation programs in pregnancy.
Related:
Search WSIPP reports


Filter By Topic -
Benefit-cost analysis
Children’s services
Criminal justice
Adult corrections

Juvenile justice

Employment/Welfare
General government
Health care
Higher education
Inventories
Mental health
Pre-K-12 education
Prevention
Public health
Substance abuse
Transportation

Filter By Author -
Madeline Barch
Bethanne Barnes
Kristofer Bitney
Julia Cramer
Adam Darnell
Elizabeth Drake
Danielle Fumia
Rebecca Goodvin
Joshua Grice
Lijian He
Michael Hirsch
Chasya Hoagland
Stephanie Lee
Matt Lemon
Marna Miller
Catherine Nicolai
Eva Westley
(show all authors)

Filter By Date
From:  
To:  
BOARD
STAFF
CONTACT
 
110 FIFTH AVENUE SE, SUITE 214
P O BOX 40999
OLYMPIA, WA 98504
 
360.664.9800
institute@wsipp.wa.gov